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The two ways Amar’e Stoudemire can win the Knicks a championship.

Posted By Michael Collins On Aug 30 2012 @ 10:29 pm In New York Knicks | No Comments

When Stoudemire was signed a couple seasons ago to try an
entice the best player in the modern game to come to New York I am sure like me,
most Knicks fans were happy with that move even though it cost us one hundred
million dollars.

Has he played to his 100 million dollar price tag? I don’t think
many people will argue when I say he has not returned on his investment. Excuses
can be made for his sub-par performance so far, whether it is not meshing well
with Carmelo Anthony or the injuries or even the fact the now J.R Smith is
eating into his shots as well.

Last season in 47 games for New York in a shortened season
Stoudemire had 45 blocks that is 0.95 blocks a night for one of the more
athletic big guys in the game. In his first season with Knicks in 2010-2011 in
78 games he had 150 blocks that is 1.92 blocks a game good for a top ten spot
in last season’s rankings. In 2007-2008 he had 163 blocks in 79 games pushing
his average per game to 2.06 good for 4th in last year’s ranking.

In four seasons before coming to New York over the span of 296 games Stoudemire had 2,667 rebounds,
9.02 rebounds a game. In two seasons for New York that average has dropped for
by a full rebound to 8.0 per game and in 2012 his average was just 7.8.

Just a reminder Stoudemire is 6 foot 10 inches tall weighing
in at 245 pounds and he has registered a 40 inch vertical jump, definitely one
of the top ten athletes in the league. Ryan Anderson for Orlando average 0.1
less rebounds per game than Stoudemire last season, I think we can all agree
Anderson is not one of the most athletic big guys in the league.

The point I am trying to make is that if Stoudemire plays 32
minutes a game for 82 games and he averages 18.0 PPG, 9.0 RPG and 2.0 BPG the Knicks
will win more games. If that stat line is worth 100 million or not is irrelevant,
that stat line will help the Knicks in the ways they need help, defensively. Any
GM will tell you that money is spent for wins not for all-star game appearances
or MVP trophies and Amar’e hitting those lines will equal more wins guaranteed.

The second way Stoudemire can help the Knicks win a
championship is being traded. This concept may have been discussed by other
people but the fact is Stoudemire is still worth something if he is traded now.

Example one, Amar’e Stoudemire and Reymond Felton to Philadelphia for Jrue Holiday and Thaddeus Young. This trade would mean firstly that the Knicks pick up a very good, athletic point guard in Holiday. Holiday is a very good defender and he has the ability to penetrate with ball on offense freeing space for Melo in the mid-range game. The other advantage of this trade means Melo can spend more time at the 4 spot where he had huge success at the end of last season.

Example two, Amar’e Stoudemire to Charlotte for Kemba Walker
and Tyrus Thomas and a draft pick preferably a first round. Kemba walker gives
the Knicks two things, he is a great young scorer that can play point guard or
shooting guard and he is only 22. With Jason Kidd mentoring him and Reymond Felton
taking the pressure of starting off his shoulders Walker could develop some
great attributes in the Knicks system. Tyrus Thomas also adds some good
rebounding and defence which could help the older legs of Chandler and Camby.

The Knicks season does not rest entirely on Amar’e Stoudemire’s’
shoulders but I think it’s time he lets the excuses go out the door and puts
some work in for a franchise that has invested so much in him.

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